Famous Architectural Styles in Vienna

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Vienna is a city in Europe which takes your breath away. It offers magnificent tall structures featuring all types of architecture within the good reputation for Europe. In the Imperial castles and places of worship towards the opera houses and museums, this Austrian capital has indeed a lot to provide to vacationers who would like to experience Vienna’s wealthy history and culture.

Everything began throughout the reign of Empress Maria Theresa and her boy Frederick II within the 1700s when regal structures were built within the city. Two major figures in the area of architecture in those days were Johann Lukas von Hildebrand and Josef Emanuel Fischer von Erlach.

Through the second area of the 1800s, another major change happened in Viennese architecture. It had been during this period when Emperor Franz Frederick I purchased the Ring boulevard to become restructured. Structures then featured the Baroque architecture thanks to famous architects Gottfried Semper and Karl Von Hasenauer. Both of these men were accountable for the Museum of proper Arts and also the Condition Opera House.

The Skill deco style arrived at the beginning of the 1800s. Known in Viennese language as Juqendstil, the skill deco architecture dominates the tube network in Vienna that is credited to Otto Wagner. Other works of Wagner with this particular style range from the Majolica House situated in the Naschmarkt and also the Postsparkasse within the city’s first district. The Secession building is yet another illustration of a skill deco architecture made by Frederick Maria Olbricht, students of Wagner.

But apart from the standard structures, realize that modern architecture also exists within this Austrian capital. An important figure noted for his modern style is Friedensreich Hundertwasser who had been keen on colors but disliked straight lines. His works range from the Hundertwasserhaus, a condo complex by having an odd design but is Vienna’s third top tourist attraction and KunstHaus Wien.